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kendrickkilledmyvibe:

Ab-Soul: I’m Soulo, take a photo, blowin do-do in a dojo
Kendrick Lamar: We a green light, you a no go Hey Q go!
Schoolboy Q: No, Rock go!
Jay Rock: I’ma rock though, like Barack though, and my eyes low and I drive slow like Paul Wall
Schoolboy Q: Give it back though, I got y’all
Ab-Soul: Nah fuck that, I’mma ball hog
Kendrick Lamar: No fuck that, they gon’ fall off
Schoolboy Q: Gotta sawed off, I’mma hop out, let it all off, hop back in, then haul off
Kendrick Lamar: We situated, we hit the pavement so hard we all got ground to play with
Ab-Soul: A challenger is like, last year calendars
Jay Rock: Yup, you’re all outdated
Kendrick Lamar: We all amazing, you all can hate it, you can live or die that’s your ultimatum, married to the game at the alter wasted, a pound of white rice on the tribe of asians
Schoolboy Q: Niggas they’ll ride for me, bitches they desire me and what’s the one thing they hate most?
Jay Rock: sayin’ bye to me!

They’ve got their little categories, like ‘conscious’ and ‘gangsta’. It used to be a thing where hip-hop was all together. Fresh Prince would be on tour with N.W.A. It wasn’t like, ‘You have got to like me in order for me to like you.’ That’s just some more white folks trying to think that all niggas are alike, and now it’s expanded. It used to be one type of nigga; now it’s two. There is so much more dimension to who we are. A monolith is a monolith, even if there’s two monoliths to choose from. I ain’t mad at Snoop. I’m not mad at Master P. I ain’t mad at the Hot Boys. I’m mad when that’s all I see. I would be mad if I looked up and all I saw on TV was me or Common or The Roots, because I know that ain’t the whole deal. The real joy is when you can kick it with everyone. That’s what hip-hop is all about. […] They keep trying to slip the ‘conscious rapper’ thing on me. I come from Roosevelt Projects, man. The ghetto. I drank the same sugar water, ate hard candy. And they try to get me because I’m supposed to be more articulate, I’m supposed to be not like the other Negroes, to get me to say something against my brothers. I’m not going out like that, man.
Mos Def on being called a “conscious rapper” (via goalsetc)
vmagazine:

Martha Cooper: Hip Hop Files 1979 - 1984
Martha Cooper has the reputation of being the first and foremost photographer of hip hop culture in New York City.
Cooper was a photo-journalist living in New York City when she first began documenting the origins of B-boy (short for break-boys) and hip hop culture. While other New Yorkers at the time saw this movement as a trite, uninspired or even offensive fad, Martha found a new form of expressing art. Through her camera lens we recount the infancy of hip-hop culture, from the alleys and subways of New York to the masses beyond the boroughs. (available on amazon,  also check out Jamel Shabazz photo series)
Producer Amerigo Gazaway: *Soul Mates* series continues the theme of his previous work in creating collaborations that never were. On the series’ first installment, the producer unites Brooklyn rapper Yasiin Bey (Mos Def) and soul legend Marvin Gaye for a soul stirring masterpiece mashup aptly titled “Yasiin Gaye: The Departure (Side One)
Stream the whole thing on SoundCloud or download it here (for a limited time).
photos:©martha cooper. all rights reserved
Zoom Info
vmagazine:

Martha Cooper: Hip Hop Files 1979 - 1984
Martha Cooper has the reputation of being the first and foremost photographer of hip hop culture in New York City.
Cooper was a photo-journalist living in New York City when she first began documenting the origins of B-boy (short for break-boys) and hip hop culture. While other New Yorkers at the time saw this movement as a trite, uninspired or even offensive fad, Martha found a new form of expressing art. Through her camera lens we recount the infancy of hip-hop culture, from the alleys and subways of New York to the masses beyond the boroughs. (available on amazon,  also check out Jamel Shabazz photo series)
Producer Amerigo Gazaway: *Soul Mates* series continues the theme of his previous work in creating collaborations that never were. On the series’ first installment, the producer unites Brooklyn rapper Yasiin Bey (Mos Def) and soul legend Marvin Gaye for a soul stirring masterpiece mashup aptly titled “Yasiin Gaye: The Departure (Side One)
Stream the whole thing on SoundCloud or download it here (for a limited time).
photos:©martha cooper. all rights reserved
Zoom Info
vmagazine:

Martha Cooper: Hip Hop Files 1979 - 1984
Martha Cooper has the reputation of being the first and foremost photographer of hip hop culture in New York City.
Cooper was a photo-journalist living in New York City when she first began documenting the origins of B-boy (short for break-boys) and hip hop culture. While other New Yorkers at the time saw this movement as a trite, uninspired or even offensive fad, Martha found a new form of expressing art. Through her camera lens we recount the infancy of hip-hop culture, from the alleys and subways of New York to the masses beyond the boroughs. (available on amazon,  also check out Jamel Shabazz photo series)
Producer Amerigo Gazaway: *Soul Mates* series continues the theme of his previous work in creating collaborations that never were. On the series’ first installment, the producer unites Brooklyn rapper Yasiin Bey (Mos Def) and soul legend Marvin Gaye for a soul stirring masterpiece mashup aptly titled “Yasiin Gaye: The Departure (Side One)
Stream the whole thing on SoundCloud or download it here (for a limited time).
photos:©martha cooper. all rights reserved
Zoom Info

vmagazine:

Martha Cooper: Hip Hop Files 1979 - 1984

Martha Cooper has the reputation of being the first and foremost photographer of hip hop culture in New York City.

Cooper was a photo-journalist living in New York City when she first began documenting the origins of B-boy (short for break-boys) and hip hop culture. While other New Yorkers at the time saw this movement as a trite, uninspired or even offensive fad, Martha found a new form of expressing art. Through her camera lens we recount the infancy of hip-hop culture, from the alleys and subways of New York to the masses beyond the boroughs. (available on amazon,  also check out Jamel Shabazz photo series)

Producer Amerigo Gazaway: *Soul Mates* series continues the theme of his previous work in creating collaborations that never were. On the series’ first installment, the producer unites Brooklyn rapper Yasiin Bey (Mos Def) and soul legend Marvin Gaye for a soul stirring masterpiece mashup aptly titled “Yasiin Gaye: The Departure (Side One)

Stream the whole thing on SoundCloud or download it here (for a limited time).

photos:©martha cooper. all rights reserved

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